Here’s the Plan: Themed Issue Previews

We don’t have time for new year, new me because we’re too busy with the new ALP!

Over the course of an amazing year establishing antilang. and putting together our first three issues, we noticed contributors tend to gravitate toward certain themes and genres. So, to encourage good short writing in these areas while giving our issues more cohesion and nuance, we’ve decided that our next three issues (antilang. no. 4-6) will be themed. We’re hoping to invite guest editors to help out with each issue (we already have two on board for no. 4—stay tuned for the big reveal!) and lend broader and more diverse perspectives to our team.

“But what are the themes?” you ask. Without further adieu, here’s the plan:

antilang. no. 4: Succinct Speculations (Spring 2019)

  • SciFi, fantasy, weird, horror, alternate history/present/reality, etc.
  • Details on guest editors, their definitions of “spec fic,” and what they’re looking for in submissions coming soon!
  • Submissions open Feb. 1st
no. 4 font idea
font prototype for antilang. no. 4

antilang. no. 5: Pithy Politics (Fall 2019)

  • Bold poems, outspoken prose, and micro manifestos
  • Just in time for the Canadian federal election!
  • Submissions open June 1st

antilang. no. 6: Blunt Blogs (Winter 2020)

  • Creative writing from your blog (any genre/topic)
  • A platform for your ‘previously published’ work (because many mags don’t accept work if it’s been on a blog before)
  • Submissions open Oct. 1st

See our Submission Guidelines for full details.

A note on soundbite: our audio publication will be open for general submissions during the same windows as antilang. Contributors are welcome to send audio submissions that match antilang.’s themed issues but we’re happy to hear byte-sized readings on other topics as well.

New Work from 32 Contributors!

We’re so excited to launch our latest issues of antilang. and soundbite! Check out some amazing short work from established and emerging writers across Canada and beyond.

Read antilang. no. 3 and listen to soundbite vol. 2 and tell us what you think!

antilang. Preview: Lisa Baird’s “When I think of him now”

Lisa Baird’s pointedly pithy poem is our final antilang. preview, meaning no. 3 is just around the corner! “When I think of him now” is the first of Lisa’s three poems in the issue.baird previewLisa Baird is a poet & a queer white settler living on Attawandaron/Mississaugas of the New Credit territory (Guelph, ON). She’d rather write poems than bios. www.lisabaird.ca.

Introducing our New Art Director!

Hello, we know we’ve been a bit quiet since our launch and opening for submissions, but that doesn’t mean we aren’t hard at work behind the scenes. It’s time to share with you something we’ve had in the works for a little while: we now have an Art Director!

Lissa McFarland has been involved with The ALP since it’s inception–starting with designing our first logo and the cover for antilang. no. 1. But she’s not just a visual artist–you can read her creative non-fiction prose poetry in antilang. no. 2 (pages 64-7) and listen to her read poetry in soundbite vol. 1 (9:02-10:16).

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As Art Director, Lissa will be taking over our Instagram account (and if you follow her personal or artist pages, then you know her comments are amazing). In addition to this, she will be on the hunt for a Canadian artist for the cover of antilang. no. 3 and involved with layouts and designs for both publications as necessary. She might even write us a blog post or two about how she sees visual art fitting into our mandate of good. short. writing.

A proud member of Calgary’s queer community, Lissa will also be involved in helping us become better editors for submissions that deal with subject positions we do not have access to. We have always striven to be inclusive and to help facilitate a safe space for our contributors, but we know that sometimes when we recommend cutting a phrase or switching a word, those edits could have the effect of lessening the voices we want to give space to. In the past, our contributors have been understanding with us and have explained why certain edits are not productive for their pieces. We hope that by working with Lissa, we can become better so that our contributors don’t have to put themselves in positions they might find uncomfortable (we can’t ignore power dynamics, even though we are trying to eliminate them).