antilang. no. 7 is LIVE!

After a year of themed issues and guest editors we're excited to return to our roots with an unthemed issue of Good Short Writing. antilang. no. 7 broke our previous record for most submissions and brings together 28 voices sharing short fiction, poetry, and mixed media on topics ranging from the ongoing pandemic and struggles… Continue reading antilang. no. 7 is LIVE!

Nimble. Prairie. Celebrations. Sarah Ens’s The World is Mostly Sky

Sarah Ens bursts onto the Canadian poetry scene with her debut collection, The World is Mostly Sky, published by Turnstone Press and launched via Zoom on May 7th. Refreshingly stark yet melodic, we shamelessly stole our first keyword “nimble” from Jeanette Lynes’s description of this collection during its launch. We hope you support Sarah by… Continue reading Nimble. Prairie. Celebrations. Sarah Ens’s The World is Mostly Sky

Intimately. Enjambed. Dualities. Conyer Clayton’s We Shed Our Skin Like Dynamite

We seem to be enamored with short books bearing long titles, and Conyer Clayton’s We Shed Our Skin Like Dynamite is no exception. This debut full-length collection of poetry is part of Guernica Editions’ First Poets Series and can be found on the publisher’s website or at your local independent bookseller.  Intimately. Clayton’s speaker intimately… Continue reading Intimately. Enjambed. Dualities. Conyer Clayton’s We Shed Our Skin Like Dynamite

Bewitching. Feminist. Fairy Tales. Amy LeBlanc’s I know something you don’t know

Amy LeBlanc’s debut poetry collection I know something you don’t know is a short book with a long title available now for order through local bookstores or directly from the publisher (Gordon Hill Press) to be delivered to your door. We recommend you brew yourself a mug of tea (with milk, preferably) and tuck into… Continue reading Bewitching. Feminist. Fairy Tales. Amy LeBlanc’s I know something you don’t know

Familiar. Earthy. Quiet. Frances Boyle’s This White Nest

Our third review dives into France Boyle's second poetry collection, This White Nest. Boyle's poems have appeared in antilang. no. 3 as well as no. 4 - Succinct Speculations. Her work captures a sense of familiar, earthy quiet. Familiar This White Nest draws on images familiar in two senses: they are commonplace, yet instill a strong sense… Continue reading Familiar. Earthy. Quiet. Frances Boyle’s This White Nest

soundbite vol. 4 is LIVE!

Hey everyone! We know you're all eager to read the latest in our trio of themed antilang. issues—Abrupt Environments—but it's been even longer since you've had the chance to hear from us. So, we are very excited to present the long-await 4th volume of soundbite! This volume has everything we love about orality and performance. It… Continue reading soundbite vol. 4 is LIVE!

Get to Know the Editor: Jesse Holth’s “Retching Dead Fish,” “Warning,” and “Iron and Salt”

Submissions to antilang. no. 6: Abrupt Environments are now CLOSED! So while we wait for the issue to come together, we thought we'd share three recent publications by our guest editor, Jesse Holth. First, from Canthius issue 7, is Jesse's poem "Retching Dead Fish" which you can read in this post or find in the… Continue reading Get to Know the Editor: Jesse Holth’s “Retching Dead Fish,” “Warning,” and “Iron and Salt”

On Reflections at the End of the Decade

With everyone off work and school for the holidays and the beginning of a new year—and new decade!—a lot of people have been posting about their wins for the previous year or ten years. And that’s awesome! For us at The ALP, we are super excited that we just launched antilang. no. 5: Pithy Politics… Continue reading On Reflections at the End of the Decade

Floating. Poetic. Grief. Kaitlyn Purcell’s ʔbédayine

For our second Good Short Review we took a look at Kaitlyn Purcell’s ʔbédayine, and not just because she was our guest editor for antilang. no. 5. ʔbédayine truly encompasses our mandate at The ALP for Good. Short. Writing. as it comes in at a tight 88 pages and is the 2018 winner of the… Continue reading Floating. Poetic. Grief. Kaitlyn Purcell’s ʔbédayine

“Abrupt Environments” Open for Submissions

The theme for antilang. no. 6 is “Abrupt Environments,” a topic that is particularly salient in recent months, tightly intertwined with our previous issue - Pithy Politics, and universally relevant in the anthropocene. For this issue we look forward to eco-critical submissions, but also submissions that test the boundaries of what constitutes an ‘environment’ (particularly an… Continue reading “Abrupt Environments” Open for Submissions