soundbite Preview: Lissa McFarland’s “09.13.17”

In competition for the shortest piece in soundbite vol. 1, Lissa McFarland reads her poem about raking leaves (something a lot of us can relate to this season, as long as the snow holds off). You can find her other poem “05.02.18” about spring flowers in soundbite and her creative non-fiction/prose-poem “04.26.17” on page 64 of antilang. no. 2.

antilang. Preview: Kevin Stebner’s “Oilspill”

StebnerWhile our mandate says we like: good. short. writing., we’re also interested in genre-defying/blurring work that avoids easy categorisation. This constraint-based-visual poem is one of the most different pieces in our second issue and the closest we have come to printing visual art. Now that you’ve read his project description, head over to antilang. no. 2, page 15-17 to read the poem!

soundbite Preview: Zelda Baiano’s “Unchained Melody”

Zelda Baiano was, we’re proud to say, our very first fan–the first person who isn’t a personal friend or family member to really take notice and give us lots of virtual love on social media. So we’re equally proud to publish this emerging Canadian poet with “Unchained Melody” in soundbite (she also has another poem, “Intimacy,” on page 40 of antilang. no. 2).BaianoZelda Baiano is currently studying English Literature and Language at Brock University in Southern Ontario. She has been previously published in two anthologies, The Night’s Voice, and Fresh Ink 2016.

soundbite Preview: Danica Lorer’s “Regret”

We know we’ve already launched the volume, but we can’t resist spotlighting Danica Lorer’s “Regret.” This fishy flash fic will delight and leave you with none of what the title’s promises! Click the excerpt below to hear her piece, and why not listen to the rest of the volume while you’re there? Her story opens it after all!LorerDanica Lorer has been a storyteller in Saskatchewan for more than 20 years. She’s been hit by lightning, a moose, a rogue semi-tire, vehicles, and the odd strange idea. (She is also tied with Chris Kelly for best bio in this volume.)

antilang. Preview: Jessica Mehta’s “Savagery”

Jessica Mehta’s poem “Savagery” opens antilang. no. 2 and sets the bold, political, and powerful tone that many of our emergent contributors carry on throughout the issue. Read her other poem, “Orygun,” and the rest of the issue by clicking the excerpt below.MehtaJessica Mehta is a multi-award-winning poet, storyteller, and author of 13 books. She’s a member of the Cherokee Nation and has been awarded numerous poet-in-residency positions around the world. Currently, she is a Halcyon Art Labs fellow and working on her PhD in Creative Writing at the University of Exeter. Her next poetry collection, Savagery, is forthcoming with Airlie Press in 2019.

soundbite Preview: Neil Surkan’s “A Walk”

You aren’t out of the woods yet; we’ve got a few more previews for you now that antilang. no. 2 and soundbite vol. 1 are out!

Neil Surkan’s “A Walk” engages with the thingness of things and the spaces they occupy, both in our world and our memories. He is one of two soundbite-exclusive contributors and his debut poetry collection, On High, was just released. Check it out and then give his piece in soundbite a listen by clicking the image below!

Surkan

antilang. Preview: Steve Passey’s “Borealis”

PasseyOur second last preview before we launch antilang. no. 2 is “Borealis,” a flash fic by Steve Passey that instantly locates and characterizes its narrator with a distinct voice. This story is a perfect lead-in to fall, when the auroras become more frequent and visible in the chill evenings.

Steve Passey is originally from Southern Alberta. He is the author of the collection Forty-Five Minutes of Unstoppable Rock and the chapbook “The Coachella Madrigals,” among many others.

soundbite Preview: Dorota Renée’s “Conium Dreams”

Some of the pieces from the first volume of soundbite feature light musical accompaniment, and the subtle keyboard in Dorota Renée’s “Conium Dreams” really emphasizes the poem’s trance-like style.

Dorota Renée is a Master’s student at Concordia, a writer of poetry and fiction, and a lover of nostalgia, vintage film, and the occult.

antilang. Preview: Lonnie Monka’s “over Awarta”

Monka

Obviously, we appreciate concise writing, and we think it’s at its best when the imagery and language hone in on one moment. Lonnie Monka’s poem does just that and the fireworks pop off the page.

A freelance writer and poetry enthusiast, Lonnie Monka runs Jerusalism, an initiative to foster local literary community through events such as reading series, author meet-ups, workshops, and more. When not busy reading or writing, she enjoys posting pictures of restrooms on Instagram – @toiletsofjerusalem.