Nimble. Prairie. Celebrations. Sarah Ens’s The World is Mostly Sky

Sarah Ens bursts onto the Canadian poetry scene with her debut collection, The World is Mostly Sky, published by Turnstone Press and launched via Zoom on May 7th. Refreshingly stark yet melodic, we shamelessly stole our first keyword “nimble” from Jeanette Lynes’s description of this collection during its launch. We hope you support Sarah by… Continue reading Nimble. Prairie. Celebrations. Sarah Ens’s The World is Mostly Sky

Intimately. Enjambed. Dualities. Conyer Clayton’s We Shed Our Skin Like Dynamite

We seem to be enamored with short books bearing long titles, and Conyer Clayton’s We Shed Our Skin Like Dynamite is no exception. This debut full-length collection of poetry is part of Guernica Editions’ First Poets Series and can be found on the publisher’s website or at your local independent bookseller.  Intimately. Clayton’s speaker intimately… Continue reading Intimately. Enjambed. Dualities. Conyer Clayton’s We Shed Our Skin Like Dynamite

Bewitching. Feminist. Fairy Tales. Amy LeBlanc’s I know something you don’t know

Amy LeBlanc’s debut poetry collection I know something you don’t know is a short book with a long title available now for order through local bookstores or directly from the publisher (Gordon Hill Press) to be delivered to your door. We recommend you brew yourself a mug of tea (with milk, preferably) and tuck into… Continue reading Bewitching. Feminist. Fairy Tales. Amy LeBlanc’s I know something you don’t know

Surreal. Referential. Vignettes. Andriana Minou’s The Fabulous Dead

"Along with the reference to famous people, every vignette in this collection also refers to food or drink. The dead, it seems, revel in coffee and sauerkraut, ice cream and whiskey, much like the living. The Skyscraper Queen herself indulges in lists of food until it seems she would burst. Food and drinks are sensuously described, but the consumption of them is the key element tying these stories together. The characters consume foods and drinks the way the Skyscraper Queen consumes their stories and identities (and, perhaps, the way readers consume details of the lives of famous celebrities)."

Familiar. Earthy. Quiet. Frances Boyle’s This White Nest

Our third review dives into France Boyle's second poetry collection, This White Nest. Boyle's poems have appeared in antilang. no. 3 as well as no. 4 - Succinct Speculations. Her work captures a sense of familiar, earthy quiet. Familiar This White Nest draws on images familiar in two senses: they are commonplace, yet instill a strong sense… Continue reading Familiar. Earthy. Quiet. Frances Boyle’s This White Nest

Floating. Poetic. Grief. Kaitlyn Purcell’s ʔbédayine

For our second Good Short Review we took a look at Kaitlyn Purcell’s ʔbédayine, and not just because she was our guest editor for antilang. no. 5. ʔbédayine truly encompasses our mandate at The ALP for Good. Short. Writing. as it comes in at a tight 88 pages and is the 2018 winner of the… Continue reading Floating. Poetic. Grief. Kaitlyn Purcell’s ʔbédayine

Mothering. Gothic. Obituaries. Erin Emily Ann Vance’s Advice for Taxidermists & Amateur Beekeepers

We are very excited that our first review of good short writing is of two-time antilanger Erin Emily Ann Vance’s debut novel(la), Advice for Taxidermists & Amateur Beekeepers. Mothering. In this story surrounding the mysterious death of Margot Morris, her two daughters, and unborn baby, Vance’s writing explores the roles, rituals, and relationships of the mother… Continue reading Mothering. Gothic. Obituaries. Erin Emily Ann Vance’s Advice for Taxidermists & Amateur Beekeepers